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Caryville's candidates for mayor answer questions

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By Susan Sharp

 Duties of the mayor:

A. The Mayor:

1. Shall be chief executive officer of the municipality and shall preside at meetings of the board;

2. Shall communicate any information needed, and recommend measures the mayor deems expedient to the board;

3a. Shall make t temporary appointments of any officer or department head as those terms defined in 6-1-101, except that of alderman, arising from the absence, sickness or disability of any such officer or department head, and shall report such appointment to the board at its next regular meeting;

3b. The board may confirm or reject the mayor’s temporary appointments, or, at its discretion, make its own temporary appointments. The board shall make appointments to fill vacancies in office;

4a. May call special meetings of the board upon adequate notice to the board and adequate public notice;

4b. shall state the matters to be considered at the special meeting and the action of the board shall be limited to shores matters submitted;

5. Shall countersign checks and drafts drawn upon the treasury by the treasurer and sign all contracts to which the municipality is a party;

6. As a member of the board, may make motions and shall have a vote on all matters coming before the board;

7. Shall make appointments to boards and commissions as authorized by law;

B. Unless otherwise designated by the board by ordinance, the mayor shall perform the following duties or may designate a department head or department heads to perform any of the following duties

1. Those duties set forth in 6-4-101 if the board does not appoint a city administrator or if someone else is not designated by the board to perform those duties;

2a. Employ, promote, discipline, suspend and discharge all employees and department heads, in accordance with personnel policies and procedures, if any, adopted by the board;

2b. Nothing in this charter shall be construed as granting a property interest to employees or department heads in their continued employment;

3. Acts as purchasing agent for the municipality in the purchase of all materials, supplies and equipment for the proper conduct of the municipality’s business; provided, that all purchases shall be made in accordance with policies, practices and procedures established by the board;

4. Prepare and submit the annual budget and capital program to the board for their adoption by ordinance; and

5. Such other duties as may be requires by the board.   

JERRY CHADWELL

The LaFollette Press: What is your economic development plan for Caryville?

Jerry Chadwell: I have put together an economic development board made up of some business owners, political people and financial people that will help develop, recruit and hopefully bring some new businesses to Caryville. I have been meeting with business owners in the city of Caryville to get them involved in what we are going to call the Main Street Business Association. These folks tell me the city government at this time is very unfriendly to the business atmosphere in the city of Caryville. We will change that.

LP: What do you see as the biggest challenge faced by Caryville’s leaders?

JC: The biggest challenge is obviously new revenue without taxing the citizens. Taxing the citizens is what has happened so far over the last 10 to 12 years to bring new revenue. There have been two taxes, they call them fees. This economic development and Main Street Business Association I have been working with, our goal is to build up business in the city of Caryville. We have two really nice exits that we are not really doing much with. I want to create an avenue of communication between Caryville and the citizens. I will make my phone number public. Everything that will go before the mayor and council will go on the Internet with the exception of anything the attorney says has to be quiet. Also with that there will be a section to contact the mayor, the vice mayor, the council and the city recorder.

LP: Liquor has been a financial boost for the town. Do you see other areas that could become future revenue streams?

JC: I have talked to a local business owner that was part of the group that put on the Civil War reenactment; he thought 8,000 to 10,000 people came to that. We need to bring things like that. We have Louie Bluie; we need to do something like that in the spring. If I am elected mayor I will get on the phone, call restaurants, chain stores, whatever we can get, I will call it, as long as they go by building and zoning codes. We have got to start somewhere.

LP: What does the town need that it currently doesn’t have?

JC:  It needs proactive leadership; somebody getting out in front and taking the lead to try and make things happen. The government we currently have is a reactive government. We will be proactive. We are going to reach people.

LP: Why are you the best candidate?

JC: I think because I am going to work with everybody, no matter what kind of business they are involved in as long as they meet the codes the city currently has. I will be very pro- business but with the understanding I live in a residential subdivision. I don’t want a business in my residential subdivision; I am not going to let that kind of thing happen. Its not the government’s job to create an entertainment venue for the citizens but the government can certainly work with different organizations such as the Louie Bluie folks and people of that sort that may want to bring some other kind of opportunity for citizens to get involved. One thing I have promised folks is no matter what else happens we will give 110 percent effort to build Caryville up for the citizens and business owners.

CHRIS STANLEY

The LaFollette Press: What is your economic development plan for Caryville?

Chris Stanley: What I would like to do is get a strong foundation of industrial jobs. I will look at the plans other places have and do that. Clinton has several automotive plants we would like to talk to tier two and tier three suppliers. We would like to offer an incentive. We would like to lease land, give them something upfront. What we would offer is an incentive on the first and second year lease, giving them a five to 10 year contract. Right now we are selling land. We are going to run out. We are always going to have the land with a lease. I want to create jobs where people can live and work in Caryville. That’s what we really need to work on. There could be some great development for restaurants to come into Caryville. I want to interface with these companies.

LP: What do you see as the biggest challenge faced by Caryville’s leaders?

CS: The biggest challenge we face now- the city as a whole, more than anything is the economics of the city. We can no longer project one year out. We need to have a vision for five to 10 years. Another thing we are facing is a lack of land.  Our economic plan has to been to sell a piece of land to get through the budget. With the retail stores we have, its no secret we have liquor stores, but with taxes coming in from those stores, look ahead. What if Jacksboro allows liquor stores? We need to see our future. Caryville is the gateway to Campbell County. We have to promote that. The biggest thing right now- projects. What could happen to Caryville if we could get manufacturing jobs and not rely on retail stores by themselves.

LP: Liquor has been a financial boost for the town. Do you see other areas that could become future revenue streams?

CS: Absolutely. I think the tourism. We are the first stop. We control the exits. We should have friendly things pointing out places to stay. We need to tap into Cove Lake. We haven’t done this in the past. We have great resources and great industrial parks.

LP: What does the town need that it currently doesn’t have?

CS: First we can’t do anything without communication. Nobody knows how to get a hold of Caryville. We need a communication database, a link to the Internet. We have a book of all the laws Caryville has. I want to index that and place it on the Internet. That way people can go through, create a work requisition that will send a department email to a work supervisor and councilman over the department and the mayor. Now we don’t have anything. Now you call and ask and they say we are going to put you on a list. This would help with communication barriers. We can’t grow as a city with communication barriers. The second thing I would like to work on is we need roadwork. We have not had roadwork in I would guesstimate 10 years. I want to make a list of the worst possible roads in the Caryville city limits. We are going to try to make a difference. The third thing we need is pre maintenance, don’t wait to fix it. We have a wonderful street department. These guys work, they put in a lot of hours

LP: Why are you the best candidate?

CS: There are three Ts I want to touch on. That is trust, truth and its time. The reason I am the best candidate is I have a passion. I have lived in Caryville 18 years. I have lived around the county but nothing beats Cove Lake. The people are nice. I want to see Caryville be an icon for the county. If you don’t have a passion for a job you won’t do it well. This is not going to be a job one person can handle by themselves. It will take cooperation and caring. You have to have a passion to see your town do great. I have two children and I don’t want them to have to get a job out of town.

ROBERT STOOKSBURY

The LaFollette Press: What is your economic development plan for Caryville?

Robert Stooksbury: The city has a fund balance of $315,000. That is the most the city has had in many, many years. With several projects on the horizon, such as the two mentioned at the October city council meeting, the economic outlook is good for the city. Fabrite is adding two to four more jobs as well.  There will be around 150 jobs coming to Caryville between now and spring. We will continue to work with the state, TVA and the office of economic development and the county to attract businesses to Caryville and the county. On the mountain we have 40 to 50 acres we can use for manufacturing jobs. We also want to work with existing companies as well.

LP: What do you see as the biggest challenge faced by Caryville’s leaders?

RS: To continue to attempt to grow the city and provide services at the level citizens have become accustom to. Caryville has had hard economic times in the past but with $315,000 fund balance I believe we can continue the quality of services within our budget.

LP: Liquor has been a financial boost for the town. Do you see other areas that could become future revenue streams?

RS: Yes.  We have a new hotel going in and two additional projects. Caryville’s only revenue stream is revenue. That is the driver of our budget. Hotel/motel tax, liquor tax and sales tax is 75 percent of our budget every year. We are at the mercy of the consumer and the traveler. With the proximity to the interstate we have a consistent consumer base. Without those two exits the city would be in dire straits.

LP: What does the town need that it currently doesn’t have?

RS: We have applied for a $300,000 CDBG (Community Development Block Grant) that is an 89/11 split where the maximum cost would be $33,000. It would be used to construct a new fire hall that would be built next to city hall. The fire department is busting at the seams. We have three pumpers, a pick up truck and a support truck in a three bay station. The fire department has outgrown the building. A new fire department would open up the entire area for other departments. Caryville needs to start another paving project. The last project is nearly paid off. We need to look very seriously at another paving project. I would like to see us have two paid firemen for days. With an all volunteer fire department the hours of 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. are the least covered time as far as manpower. The police department is pretty well staffed and the street department could use one more person. All of these things have been needed for a long time but we haven’t had the funds to do it. I would like to work towards replenishing the rainy day fund.

LP: Why are you the best candidate?

RS:I have been associated with the city of Caryville for 38 years. I started as a fireman at the age of 17. I was fire chief for 10 years, served on the council for two years and have been fortunate enough to serve as mayor for eight years. I feel my experience in the town, working with budgets, which began when I was fire chief, helps bolsters my candidacy. I have learned how to manage on a short budget. I am the most qualified experience wise. In my eight years as mayor Caryville has always had a balanced budget. I love Caryville. My purpose is to make it a better place for its citizens, our children, and grandchildren so it can continue on its current economic path.