.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

City to rebid City Hall roof project

-A A +A

By PETER SAWYER

The LaFollette City Council could vote to accept bids to repair the roof over city hall at Tuesday’s meeting.
At the workshop, council member Hansford Hatmaker encouraged the other council members to handle the bidding process correctly.
“Let’s try to do it right this time,” Hatmaker said. “It’s been nothing but a problem.”
In March, the city council voided a contract with Dixie Roofing. Dixie Roofing owner, Mike Malicote, had been awarded the contract in January when he had the low bid of $21,976. However, Malicote later came before the council after his crew found water in the roof. The specifications used for the project wouldn’t work, Malicote said. Malicote recommended the city use specifications he helped it obtain from Michael Brady, Inc. last year for $9,000. Based on these specifications, he proposed an $85,000 change order that would remove the roof to the deck and install new materials at a slope so rain could drain from the building. However, city attorney Reid Troutman recommended the council rebid the project and compensate Malicote for the money he had already invested.
The council will repay Malicote $12,900, interim city administrator Jimmy Jeffries said.
Hatmaker believes repairing the whole roof would cost too much money.
“I know we need a new roof,” Hatmaker said.
However, he believes the city has many other expenses, and fixing the roof could exhaust its resources. If the council later needs to raise taxes to finance its needs, the council can “count me out,” Hatmaker said.
Hatmaker would also rather use city money to raise employees’ salaries.
“We’ve not given them a raise in three years,” Hatmaker said.
While the city didn’t give the employees a raise this year, it paid for their health insurance, Mayor Mike Stanfield said.

Materials
Troutman asked if the city would be able to keep the materials Malicote purchased for the project.
While the city would keep the materials, it won’t be able to use them, Jeffries said. He recommended selling them so it would be able to profit from them.