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Letters to Editor Jan. 13, 2011

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 Editor,

LaFollette Press:

I live in LaFollette, I am so pleased of how wonderful is the library service in my town and I would like to share with you my experience.

Due to my training as a physician I have lived in different states and I make sure I always have a library card. From my first day at LaFollette library I was deeply impressed of the outstanding service Nancy Green provides to every person who comes to the library.

Nancy Green is really passionate about her job and the library. She goes far beyond her duties when people need extra help in the computers or in any other issues. I have seen her helping an elderly woman that needed to do some work on the computer and at the same time she made sure that she took care of the people who come to the front. I have been in libraries which have several people working and they are not as effective as Ms. Green is.

Ms. Green never stops working, when nobody needs her help on the computers she is organizing booking or answering the phone, she is competent, friendly, caring, reliable, conscientious and I can go for pages long with positive adjectives to describe her, in one sentence, she is just outstanding.

I am proud of our librarian Nancy Green and our LaFollette library. I look forward to our bigger library where we will still have one of the best librarian ever, Nancy Green.

Sincerely,

Juliana Cabrera-Alonso, MD, MPH

LaFollette 

 

 Editor,

LaFollette Press:

An investigative citizen journalist deals with facts deeper than the surface. A credible journalist is more than just a good writer—they learn to trust and engage their instincts as well as providing more to the citizens than “icing on the cake” journalism without any real “cake”.

Your judgment of citizens concerned about the world around us is not only self-righteous, but insults every American citizen practicing their 1st Amendment rights. I am leery of journalist who say they are offended by a citizen journalist. A credible journalist has tough skin and is unaffected by competing journalists unless they’re subconsciously threatened by their own writing or ability.

Isn’t this the pot calling the kettle black? The news organization you work for failed miserably to tell the entire story of the possible criminal activities of two of Campbell County’s former highest paid public school system leaders. Your news organization was out of touch enough to continue praising the former school director after he resigned. Who did their homework—the citizen journalist or the “journalism major”? Your failure to report my investigation uncovering this story misleads the local taxpayer. You showed your readers your lack of credibility.

A true journalist asks questions during public meetings. If you want a lesson in what a true journalist is, watch the big boy networks during press conferences and during other meetings. You will see how a true professional conducts business. This might help you learn more “tricks of the trade”.

What this is about is your fear of competing as a professional journalist—you are intimidated by people who are giving your style of journalism a run for the money. Citizens tire of cookie-cutter and bland style of journalism. They care about a real story—and if you can bring it—fine! If you can’t, move aside because citizen journalists are here to stay!

Your respect is not required. This is about citizens getting and reporting factual information—not about having to go through some arrogant journalist’s hoops to get the facts out to the public. You are not even in the same league with a true investigative journalist!

Jerry Chadwell 

Caryville

 

Editor,

LaFollette Press:

The editorial headline in The Press last week, “Citizen journalist—friend or foe?” reminded me of an old saying, “That remark resembles me.”

From my mostly obscure station in life, and with so many more worthy subjects on which to wax editorially, I was surprised to make the editorial page of this local institution. Although they did not name me specifically, I believe they will concede I was the subject of their editorial.

Ms. Colbaugh as the writer, and Ms. Sharp as the editor, summarized their opinion of me saying, “Yet there are some people who can’t figure out what they are supposed to do with their lives. They try politics, and that doesn’t work, so they take up a pen and introduce themselves as a journalist. I am offended. 

Occasionally, I write stories for another publication. Apparently, Ms. Colbaugh believes I am among the “unqualified people attempting to cover the news,” in this community, and writes “In my opinion these individuals are disrespecting the profession.”

While I do not have the same educational background or professional credentials to write newspaper stories as insightfully as reporters working for The Press, the profession of journalism has long been associated with characteristics such as passion for writing, proficient skills of articulation, unfolding reality to the world, and spreading awareness amongst the readers. While it might be my biased opinion, I think I bring these characteristics to my writing, and don’t plan on turning my pen into plowshares anytime soon.

It’s true, I tried politics. I mustered the courage and finances to wage two mostly well-respected and informative political campaigns that lost out to the politics of status quo, to which the LaFollette Press, in my opinion, subscribes.

And it’s also true I still haven’t decided what I want to be when I grow up; I’m still exploring all the possibilities. I don’t claim to be a journalist, so I can’t be “masquerading as a journalist,” as they allege. However, writing is something I enjoy doing, and will continue to employ where possible to help pay my bills.

Fred Cole

Jacksboro

Editor,

LaFollette Press:

Unity can be best summed up in the quote from the Greek storyteller, Aesop. He was quoted saying “United we stand; divided we fall”. This quote has a lot of power when talking about the biggest instrument of change in our community the Campbell County School system.

For too long there seems to be a great divided in our community, between our schools and the community itself. If our community is to experience the change that everyone wants it to, we need to develop a strong relationship between the community and the school. Members of our community wither they have a child in the school system or not need to take a more vested interest in the development of our children. 

Children are the most important resource that our community can develop and foster. These children are going to be the future doctors, nurses, teachers and productive members of society that are going to carry our community into the future and beyond. We as a whole have to come together for the greater good and start to realize the impact that we have on the children in our community.

Only together can we provide a better future for our community and the people in it.

Thank you,

Craig Ivey

Jacksboro 

 

 Editor,

LaFollette Press:

The faculty and staff of LaFollette Elementary School would like to extend a great big thank you to some very special people. St. Mary's Medical Center Of Campbell County, employees of DeRoyal Industries, Faithful Worker's Class at East Lafollette Baptist Church, Senior Ladies Class at Indiana Avenue Baptist Church, Imagine Dance Studio, Danny Chapman and the Shop With A Cop Program. Because of your generosity, many of our children had a wonderful Christmas.

Pam Jeffries

LaFollette