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Locals prepare to take part in tax-free weekend

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By Bria McKamey

Cathy Partin works in Wal-Mart’s Customer Service and is preparing for the increased crowds during Tennessee’s Annual Sales Tax Holiday.

“I’m going to be right here. And I’m glad I don’t have to be in that,” Partin said.

Tennessee’s Annual Sales Tax Holiday begins Friday at 12:01 a.m and runs through Sunday at 11:59 p.m.

Tax-free items include clothing of $100 or less per item, school and school art supplies with a price of $100 or less per item and computers with a price of $1,500 or less. Anyone can participate, but items purchased for use by a trade or business are not exempt from being taxed. Customers can also take advantage of tax-free items by ordering via mail, telephone or the Internet. Qualified items previously placed on layaway are exempt from being taxed when the final payment is made during the holiday.

Computers may be purchased separately, but accessories such as printers, monitors, speakers etc. must be part of a bundled computer package to be eligible. Other electronic items not exempt include: individually purchased software, storage media, handheld electronic schedulers, PDAs and electronic readers, video game consoles and supplies for printers, such as paper and ink.

Local businesses can expect a large influx of customers during the holiday.

Although many customers come in to purchase school supplies, according to Jacksboro Wal-Mart management, the store actually sells more apparel during this time.

“Shop early. Mid-day, it gets even more crowded, especially during this time, because it’s tax-free weekend, but it’s also the first of the month,” Hoyt, a member of management, said.

Marie Widener, assistant manager of Goody’s located at 2500 Jacksboro Pike, LaFollette, also said customers should shop early and the store is extending its hours during the holiday.

“Our busiest hours are from two to six. It’s mostly parents coming in with their kids to buy back-to-school clothes,” Widener said.

Owner of the local Radio Shack on 310 Main St. in Jacksboro, Eddie Wiggins said the holiday does not affect his business as much as others.

Among the items he sells tax-free during this period, he said.