Local News

  • Jellico hosts 11th Old Fashioned Fall Festival


    • Old Fashioned Fall Festival
    • Jellico Veteran’s Park
    • Friday and Saturday, Oct. 7-8
    • Vendors open at 10 a.m. each day


    • Friday
    • Noon-6 p.m. open mic
    • 8 p.m. Eddie Barber and the Kentucky Bred Band


  • LUB makes policy changes

     The LaFollette Utility Board approved several policy changes at the September meeting this past Monday.

    During the workshop LUB General Manager Kenny Baird explained these changes to the board.

    There were eight policies that were repealed or amended.

  • Chamber of Commerce to host annual pig roast

     On Oct. 27, the Campbell County Chamber of Commerce will host its annual community pig roast.

    This is one of two fundraisers the Chamber does throughout the year. Chamber director E. L. Morton described it as a Chamber team effort, and said all the chamber members are invited.

    “It’s a great community event,” Morton said.

    Admission is $20 for adults and $10 for children.

    For the first time, the roast will be held at the Ball Farm Event Center.

  • Commission at odds over FMS appointments

    When it came time to appoint members to the Financial Management System Committee Monday night the county commission proved to be a house divided.

    According to policy, the commission is required to vote on appointments to each statutory and elective committee annually during the September meeting.

    While the vote to name County Mayor William Baird and Commissioner Johnny Bruce to the commission chairman and vice chairman positions respectively were unanimous, assembling the four non-statutory posts on the FMS proved to be more challenging.

  • Horner gives an account from the road

    Bill Horner rode his bicycle across the state on US 70. But the ride was only half the challenge.

    “This (ride) was really a two part journey,” he said. “First there was the adventure of the ride, and then there was the adventure of coming back to tell about it.”

    When the Campbell County Baptist Association missionary began his ride at the Tennessee/North Carolina border in September 2008, he approached it the way one might eat an elephant — one bite at a time.

  • Local business owner on a mission to help women

    Shona Phelps is on a mission to help women.

    After attending a seminar about how to maximize the effectiveness of coupons, Phelps said she was disappointed with the information she got.

    “We all paid $10 to have this lady come in and most of us already knew the things she told us,” Phelps said. “I’ve been single for 12 years and I’ve raised four kids on coupons.”

  • Evans named chief deputy

    State Highway Patrol Officer Aaron Evans has been named chief deputy at the Campbell County Sheriff’s Department.

    The announcement came last week after “a lot of praying,” Sheriff Robbie Goins said on Monday. Evans replaces the former chief, Jonathan Finley. Finley was terminated from the department earlier this month due to “policy violations.”

    “We have a lot of work ahead of us,” Goins said. “But Aaron is eager to get started and he will do an excellent job.”

  • Campbell Culture Coalition to host fifth annual Louie Bluie Festival

    The Louie Bluie Festival is coming back for the fifth year, and will again be held at Cove Lake State Park on Oct. 1.

    “This is just a festival celebrating the culture and the arts in Campbell County and its surrounding area,” Campbell Culture Coalition Treasurer and Festival Co-Chair Jocelyn Griffo said.

  • Conflict over annexation heats up

    Annexation wasn’t on the agenda for Jellico’s Sept. 15 board of mayor and aldermen meeting, but it was on the people’s mind.

    A crowd showed up to show their displeasure over the town’s plans for expansion. At 6:30 p.m., a seat could not be found, forcing many to stand in the packed meeting room.

    Talk of annexation had attracted the crowd, and created a stir in the areas surrounding Jellico.

    The board was not ready to talk about annexation, Mayor Les Stiers said.

  • Child injured in dog attack

    A dog attack turned a typical Friday afternoon into a horrific ordeal for a 10-year-old LaFollette boy and his family.

    Teresa Goins said on Sept. 16 her grandson, Timothy Bolinger, had enjoyed the Campbell County High School homecoming parade that day before returning home to the small farm where he lives with his father in the Davis Chapel community.

    According to Goins, Timothy had walked up the road a short distance to check on his goats. On the way back, he was viciously attacked by a neighbor’s dog.