Local News

  • The story of the year for 2011

     Earlier this month the LaFollette Press posed a question to readers- “What story had you talking this year?”

    When the votes were tallied, it was nearly a unanimous decision.

    Wanda Cieslak and the death of her newborn son was the headline that grabbed everyone’s attention not letting go.

    This was a story that broke hearts and enraged people simultaneously.

  • Jellico leaders sign agreement with Montclair

     Last Thursday, the Jellico Board of Mayor and Aldermen signed an agreement to extend Montclair Technologies’ lease on the Taylor Machine Shop building until March 1, 2012.

    There will be no extensions to this agreement, Mayor Les Stiers said.

  • City agrees to settle with Mongar

      For more than two years Darrell Mongar's suit against the city of LaFollette has waded through the necessary legal channels. But on Monday evening, despite Councilman Hansford Hatmaker's best efforts to put off a vote his colleagues said yes to a resolution.

    In September 2009 David Dunaway filed a $100,000 lawsuit in circuit court on Mongar's behalf. The filing alleged the LaFollette City Council passed on hiring him for a position with the LaFollette Police Department based on his age and handicap.

  • Commission puts off filling vacancy

    Monday’s commission meeting marked the last of 2011. But when the group reconvenes in the new year they will be facing an old issue.

    When third district Commissioner Melvin Boshears announced in the November meeting he would be vacating his seat effective Dec. 1 it sparked a winding debate among the remaining commissioners about how the veteran commissioner would be replaced.

  • Christmas tree sawed down in Caryville

     While most people have been decorating Christmas trees, Caryville has been cleaning up the remains of one.

    Before Thanksgiving, an unknown vandal, armed with a chainsaw, felled a beloved evergreen at the ballpark across Main Street from the BP station.

    “It’s just sad that someone would do that for (apparently) no reason,” Mayor Robert Stooksbury said. “That tree wasn’t hurting anyone.”

    This 30-foot spruce pine was planted a couple decades ago in honor of Arthur Yancey, a former Caryville mayor.

  • The year in review- Jan.- June


    A dog accused of attacking an 8 year old girl was given a death sentence. Circuit Court Judge John McAffee ruled the female pit bull constituted a danger to the community. The dog bit the child in the face requiring 16 stitches.

    The Caryville Board of Mayor and Aldermen hammered out the details of a new liquor ordinance. Liquor by the drink and package stores passed in the November 2010 election.

  • State report card out; five county schools on target list

    After months of anticipation the numbers are in.

    The results recently released in the Tennessee Department of Education’s state report have some administrators with the Campbell County School System breathing a sigh of relief, while others are looking for a way to step up their game.

    “There are a lot of bright spots (in the report card) and there are other areas that give us cause for pause,” Donnie Poston, Campbell County director of schools, said of the data listed on the report card.

  • Bridge construction taking longer than originally planned

    Construction on the J. Will Taylor Bridge has overshot its completion date by three months, drawing fines from the Tennessee Department of Transportation.

    After over two years of construction, the project continues to plod along. Tuesday, traffic was reduced to one lane in both directions as it crossed the bridge.

    But the bridge has been completed for several weeks as far as opening it up to traffic, Potter South East, LLC owner Dwayne Potter said.

  • Battling addiction

    Neisha Romines speech is quick.

    As she recounts a six-month time span that temporarily ruined her life, Romines repeatedly runs her fingers through her short dark hair. It is obviously a nervous habit.

    Talking about the nightmare that meth turned her life into, it is hard to believe she was once an addict.

  • Board says yes to graduation venue change

    Oh, the times they are changing. At least when it comes to graduation at Campbell Campbell County High School they are.

    Student council representatives showed up in force at the Dec. 8 school board meeting to lobby the board to say yes to a change of venue for the event that has traditionally been held at the school’s football field.