.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Events slated to shed light on domestic violence

    Purple ribbons are popping up on businesses around the area.  But these bows are not just window dressing.  Instead, they are reminder of a problem that does not discriminate by age, culture or socioeconomic status.

    October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and Melanie Cordell, Chief Operating Officer of CHET’s Family Service Center violence in the home is a problem that plagues Campbell County.

  • Meth lab discovered during welfare check

    A Friday afternoon incident left one man arrested and a child at the emergency room for examination.

    LaFollette Police Sgt. Joe Brown and Officer Robert Chadwell received a call to assist a Tennessee Department of Children’s Services case manager with a welfare check at 401 East Beech Street.

    When officers and DCS personnel arrived at the scene approximately 15 adults and one child were inside the residence.

  • Event planned to showcase local artists

    The art community in Campbell County is thriving these days.  As a way to showcase some of the local talent the Campbell County Artist’s Association is teaming up with the city of LaFollette Parks and Recreation Department to host Art In the Park.

    On Oct. 16 area artisans will converge on Seargant Park to display their wares for the public to view and purchase.

  • Lack of zoning creates headache for valley community

    There’s a thin line between what will soon be the county’s newest Dollar General Store and a number of local residences. And the line is called Calhoun Road.

    Since learning their tranquility in the Powell Valley would fall victim to Campbell County’s version of urban sprawl, property owners along Calhoun Road and Highway 63 have gotten busy making county officials aware of their opposition.

  • Tina and Lonnie White Habitat raises awareness for 27th house

    Habitat for Humanity plans to build three houses in the next three years.

    And the journey toward building these homes was led by a group of supporters last Saturday.

    Leaving from Woodson’s Mall with riders from the Southern Sons Motorcycle Club and others supporting the cause, a parade led the way to the next building site. The group traveled through town and gathered at the site for a dedication and ground breaking ceremony.

  • Voters can begin casting votes next week

    Early voting for the November election begins Wednesday.

    While many of the municipal elections have no opposition, Administrator of Elections Dean Sexton is still confident voters will come to the polls. 

  • Local advocate battles to keep battle of Gettysburg land sacred

    Some call her a historian while others call her an activist.

    But locally, Violet Clark is a photographer whose art has become the backbone of a national ad campaign.

    Clark has studied history extensively and has a passion for the preservation of historic land. This passion led her down a path in January when she joined the No Casino Gettysburg cause.

  • Civil War Council planning annual toy run

    With just over three months left until Christmas, the Caryville Civil War Council (CCWC) is already making its list and checking it twice.

    The all volunteer group is in the middle of planning its annual toy run to benefit needy families during the holiday season.

    This year marks the ninth time engines have roared to raise funds for needy families.

    It is all about helping others, said Larry Collier a founding member of the CCWC.

  • Chamber gears up for pig roast

    If the leaves are turning and a chill is in the air that means one thing- the Campbell County Chamber of Commerce Pig Roast is just around the corner.

    Scheduled for Oct. 26 the annual event will be held at The Stables, its home for the last few years.

    “We are very excited about this event,” said Cindi Reynolds, administrative assistant at the chamber.

  • Information key in beating breast cancer

    June Lynch and Teresa Thomas have seen both sides of breast cancer.

    As health care providers it has been their duty to educate women and assist in screening them for the disease.

    But as women, they have held the hands of those they love who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.

    “It is a really scary thing for the family,” said Lynch. Her 59- year old cousin recently underwent a mastectomy. “It is hard to describe what it does to you and your family.”