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Local News

  • County handed lawsuit from injury at dump

    A local man is asking the county to compensate him for an injury he allegedly sustained at one of the area convenience centers.
    In a suit filed last Tuesday in circuit court Carlos Gross, through his attorney David Dunaway, alleges that while he was visiting the convenience center building located near Vasper he “suddenly and unexpectedly encountered a hidden and defective condition” that caused a fall that left him with “serious and disabling injuries” to his left foot.

  • ATV club to host benefit ride

    It’s only September, but the Royal Blue Rangers is already making plans for Christmas.
    On Sept. 18 the ATV club is hosting an off road ride to benefit the U.S. Marine Corps Toys for Tots foundation.
    This is the second year for the event and club members are hoping it will be bigger than ever.
    “We were able to give toys to 650 children in the area last year,” Luther Troutt, Royal Blue Ranger member, said of the success last year’s ride

  • Chamber examines community and politics

  • Long becomes new coordinator

    After spending a year and a half as a case manager with the Eighth Judicial Drug Court, Amy Long is moving up.
    Beginning this week, she became the court’s new program coordinator. It was a position left vacant when Jonathan Finley, the previous coordinator and Long’s mentor, left to assume his role as Campbell County’s new chief deputy.

  • Mine rescue event coming to Caryville

    During the third week in September, mine rescue teams from around the country will converge on Cove Lake State Park.
    While they will enjoy the scenery of the area, this will be anything but a vacation for the 20 teams.
    The groups will be taking part in a mine rescue competition hosted by the Tennessee Division of Mines. It is the first time since 1997 that Campbell County, more specifically Caryville, has hosted the two-day event scheduled for Sept. 22 and 23.

  • Hospital and employee named in sexual battery suit

    Alleged inappropriate contact with a patient recently landed St. Mary’s Medical Center of Campbell County and one of its employees in the center of a court action.
    On Aug. 24 Earnest A. Rouse filed a complaint in circuit court alleging that while he was a patient at the hospital, employee Roger Leach committed sexual battery against him.
    Rouse’s attorney Richard Baker asserts that while Rouse was a patient at SMMC in August 2009 on “repeated occasions” Leach attempted to sexually molest him.

  • July unemployment rate is 9.8 percent

    Tennessee Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development James Neeley announced Tennessee’s unemployment rate for July was 9.8 percent, down two-tenths of a percentage point from the revised June rate of 10.0 percent.  The July 2009 rate was 10.9 percent.  The national unemployment rate for July 2010 was 9.5 percent, unchanged from the June rate of 9.5 percent.

  • Sanitation department discovers meth lab

    Taking out the trash landed a Caryville man in jail this week.

    Early Monday morning, sanitation workers observed smoke rising from trash bags at a Caryville home that were destined for disposal.

    The Caryville Police Department responded to the call around 7:30 a.m. and discovered several meth components sizzling inside the bags caused by a chemical reaction, said Caryville Police Chief Johnny Jones.

  • Car shows are coming to LaFollette

    An overwhelming response to the car show last weekend has sparked a line up of more shows to come.

    Jr Ogg, president of LA Cruizer Car Club, approached the LaFollette City Council about holding a car show twice a month in LaFollette. The council gave its blessing of the events, which will draw crowds to downtown to enjoy music, food and classic automobiles.

  • Mountain Heritage Festival celebrates 40 years

    Good times filled with music, crafts, laughter and games will be held this weekend at the Mountain Heritage Festival.

    The annual event has been held in the mountains of Stinking Creek for the past four decades. Originally taking shape at a kitchen table as friends planned the first event to be held down by the water.

    The community event quickly outgrew the small creek side where it started and moved 10 miles down the road to the Mountain Heritage Field where it is still held annually.