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Local News

  • Cold weather results in higher heating costs

    Cold temperatures may have many area citizens digging deeper into their pockets to cover the costs of rising utility bills.

    Campbell County, like the rest of the south, recently experienced some of the coldest temperatures in decades.

    The New Year kicked off with bone-chilling weather that seemed to last. It went on for around 10 days to be exact, making it among the coldest and longest cold weather snaps to visit the south in decades.

  • Commission discusses traffic light and other items

    Campaigns, traffic lights and the order of meetings each prompted discussion during Tuesday night’s county commission meeting.

    As the group worked through the evening’s agenda Chairman David Young stated his intentions to keep the meetings orderly during the upcoming campaign season.

    With all of the commission seats up for grabs in the August election, Young told colleagues he would not allow commission meetings to become a campaign forum.

    “We need to keep the political campaigns out,” Young said.

  • Potter defends department

    After his department’s performance during the county’s most recent snowstorm was questioned, Dennis Potter, road superintendent, appeared before the county commission to set the record straight on Tuesday night.

  • Haiti seeing help from Campbell County

    With its balmy breezes and white sands Haiti is a world away from Tennessee.

    But when an earthquake of a deadly magnitude hit the island last week, its inhabitants became neighbors for the people here.

    As Sunday services convened across Campbell County, the Haitians were not only remembered in prayer but also when the collection plates were passed. For a country torn apart by natural disaster no donation was too small.

  • Maples arrested in Caryville for using counterfeit money

    Gary Maples may have been searching for a comedy, but his money was no laughing matter.

  • Florida man arrested on drug charges by THP

    Illegal narcotics hidden inside a child’s teddy bear resulted in an unhappy ending for a Florida man.

    Last Thursday, Tennessee Highway Patrol Trooper Kelly Smith stopped a vehicle for speeding. After speaking with the driver and issuing a warning citation, Smith then spoke with the passenger, Brian Fox, 30, of Bradenton Fla., the THP report said. Smith noted in his report that the two men’s travel itineraries differed from one another. Smith then asked Fox if there were any drugs inside the vehicle, he said no.

  • Neace arrested on 28 counts

     Heather Nicole Neace was arrested on Jan. 16 after allegedly stealing a check book from a residence in Coolidge. She was also charged with taking $1,100 worth of property from a car, including identification, according to Detective Brandon Elkins of the Campbell County Sheriff’s Department.

  • Complaint leads to arrest

     

  • Branam pleads; charges reduced

    With disgruntled parents just a few feet away and against the advice of his attorney, Dean Branam admitted he was guilty of assault on Monday.

    When he was indicted last year, the then middle school teacher was charged with three counts of sexual battery and seven counts of assault, court records said. While sexual battery is a felony under state law, by the end of his hearing, Branam had plead guilty to seven misdemeanor counts of assault by offensive touching.

    However, Branam’s attorney, Michael Hatmaker, was not the only one who disagreed with the plea.

  • Board votes yes to teaching the Bible

    After years of the Bible being banned from the classroom, the Campbell County Board of Education is brining it back; at least from a historical perspective.

    At Tuesday’s meeting the group made the unprecedented move.  After doing some research into curriculum the board voted to introduce a new elective course at the high schools that will allow the Bible to be examined as a historical document as well as a piece of literature.

    Chairman Eugene Lawson touted the benefits of the course, but also offered a warning about choosing teachers for the class with care.