Today's News

  • LaFollette man arrested on meth charges

    Last week Campbell County Sherriff’s deputies followed the trail to an alleged meth lab at a LaFollette home.

    Deputy Ty Dougherty responded to a call on Aug. 8 about a possible meth lab at 401 N. Cumberland Ave. The owner of the residence reportedly gave Dougherty permission to search the resident, and a “worn down” trail was reportedly seen in the yard of the residence to the woods behind the home.

    Dougherty allegedly walked the trail where he reportedly found a basket containing several components to manufacture methamphetamine.

  • CHET celebrates 30th anniversary, grand opening of health clinic

    Community Health of East Tennessee (CHET) celebrated the new clinic and 30 years of service to Campbell County on Aug. 10.

    “It was a really good day,” said Teresa Dabney, CHET’s CEO.

    On hand for the celebration was Sen. Ken Yager, Rep. Dennis Powers, representatives from Sen. Lamar Alexander and Rep. Chuck Fleishmann’s offices.

    The master of ceremonies was Ret. Gen. Carl Stiner. A presentation was given on CHET’s work within the community.

  • November elections starting to take shape

    Today is the final day to qualify for the November municipal elections.

    On the ballot for the fall elections are seats in the LaFollette and Caryville governments.

    LaFollette citizens will elect a mayor when they go to the polls.

  • Delinquent motel taxes top discussion at Caryville meeting

    The Motel 8 in Caryville owes at least four months worth of taxes to the town, according to town recorder Cheryl Ivey and attorney Reid Troutman.

    “We have limited avenues in order to collect those, and I think the only thing we can do is issue a distress warrant,” Troutman said.

    A distress warrant could allow the town to execute seizures on assets of the motel.

    The dollar amount of taxes is difficult to pinpoint because the amount owed depends on the motel’s income per month. $2000 per month is a good estimate, Ivey said.

  • Board of Education discusses attendance, bullying

    After a 30-minute executive session delay, the board of education zipped through the remaining agenda items at Tuesday night’s meeting.


    The board voted unanimously to award the 2012-13 custodial supply contract to Ellison Supply after a bid of $21,768.85.

    “Recommendation for the award is Ellison Supply,” said Karen Henegar. Jeff Marlow was absent.

  • Puttin’ on steam

     Two of General Robert Neyland’s maxims were “Play for and make the breaks, and when one comes your way – Score! If at first the game or the breaks go against you, don’t let up…put on more steam.”

                The Campbell County Cougars could not have put those words into better use than they did Thursday night in the stadium named after Neyland himself.

  • Jellico playing back to basics football

                A perfect step, good hand placement, and a good snap are crucial.

                In football, it’s the little things that can make the difference between a win and a loss. For Jellico, it’s become their focus.

  • FRIDAY NIGHT PREVIEW: Jellico vs. Williamsburg

      By Chris Cannon


    When: Friday


    Where: Jellico High School


    Kickoff: 7:30 p.m.


    Records: Williamsburg (0-0) at Jellico (0-0)


    Previous meeting: The Blue Devils and the Yellowjackets met last year in the first game of the season, Williamsburg prevailing 58-0 over Jellico.


  • FRIDAY NIGHT PREVIEW: Campbell County vs. Seymour

    When: Friday


    Where: Campbell County High School; Hope L. Dossett Stadium


    Kickoff: 7:30 p.m.


    Records: Seymour (0-0) at Campbell County (0-0)


    Previous meeting: The Cougars and the Eagles met last year in the first game of the season, Seymour prevailing 42-6 over Campbell County


  • Eagles looking to better season

                Falling just short in the finals last season, the Jacksboro Eagles are looking to come back strong in their 2012 campaign. With an abundance of experienced talent on the squad, the finals may be all they have to worry about.