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  • ANDERSON COUNTY—Boyer Farms brings their summer music festival back to East Tennessee for its third year. Situated on 75 acres of rolling farm land — the horse farm takes on its alter ego as a music venue. Ten regional and local bands bring their performances to the stage Friday and Saturday. This year’s headliner includes Foz Rock’s new collaboration, Avenue of The Giants. Foz Rock was a long time member of the group Rehab whose fame includes the songs “Bartender” and “Welcome Home.”  

  • Campbell County High School Art Club president Shelby Maiden is pictured with her entry in the 2013 Wildlife Forever State Fish Art Competition. Shelby won first place in the state competition and was recognized nationally at the awards banquet held in Perry, Ga.
     

  • SCOTT COUNTY—Emerald Ash Borer — an invasive insect that destroys ash trees — has been found in neighboring Scott County.
    The identification was made recently and has been confirmed by the United States Department of Agriculture.
    The county will now be placed under quarantine —  a growing list, which already included Campbell, Knox and 17 other counties in Tennessee.

  • It was a tumultuous storm through which everyone on land and sea tried so desperately to take cover.

    The wind and waves blew so violently that their tiny boat rocked back and forth uncontrollably.

    Desperately, they tried to lighten the load by tossing overboard items that were no longer necessary in stormy weather.

    “Hold on!” one of the passengers cried. “The wind’s about to pick up!”

    They clutched their hands to the side of the boat, white knuckles gripping the watercraft in a desperate attempt to stay aboard.

  • Last year, I fully believed that a shopping excursion during Tennessee’s official tax-free weekend would be a plan of sheer brilliance.
    School supplies, computers and clothing­—all sans taxation?
    It seemed sublime. Turns out, it was a rather horrific experience that only the strongest of shoppers can overcome.
    Did I really need to save 9.25 percent on marker boards and glitter pencils for my home-schooled children?
    The answer is no—no I did not.

  • When I was little, my father never drove the interstate to Knoxville.
    Or, if we planned a trip to visit family for the day in Clinton, we would drive Tenn. 116 into Lake City.
    Rarely ever did we see the green dragon or the (now removed) Thacker Christmas Inn tree sign, as we were always on the other side of the dusty trail. My brother and I would cruise along in the backseat of our silver Dodge Dynasty, singing along to the latest hits on the weekly top 40 and enjoy the commentary provided by DJ Casey Kasem.

  • You turned 6 this week. Six.

    How is it possible that I have a 6-year-old?

    One minute you were snuggled deep into my arms in an itchy hospital blanket, and the next you are choosing your own bedroom paint colors.

    Then it will be braces and then college.

    But we are not even going to discuss those today.

  • JACKSBORO—Summer school students at Jacksboro Middle School planted the “Don Nance Campbell County Community Garden”—which was revealed to the community Friday.
    “It’s so good to see young people, and to see you out here and willing to be a part,” said Phyllis Clingner, who gave the program overview.
    Different vegetables—such as celery, beets, squash and tomatoes—are growing in the garden, which will be used to feed people in the community.

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    There’s just something about putting in a hard day’s work that makes a man sleep better at night.

    And when you build a porch from scratch, you sleep like a baby.

    We have officially dove headfirst into home improvement projects lately, considering trips to Lowe’s with its car buggies “fun for the whole family.”

    And who knew you could cram 1x4 boards into the floorboard of a minivan?

    You learn something new every day.

    And so it began.

  •  No matter what you call her—your Mamaw, Grandma, Nana, Grammy, Mimi or Granny–she surely has the cure for what ails you. A home cooked meal. A big hug. And a good smack on the rear, if you get out of line. 

    If your mamaw is from the South, she’s likely full of folk remedies from the days when a book-learned doctor was so far away that the ill would be cured—or dead—by the time he arrived. 

  • I can remember when I was a teenager, secretly dying to be 30.
    I thought: “People would finally take me serious when I am 30.”
    Kind of like when you are in elementary school and you cannot wait to get acne—because it is a mark of age.
    Growing up, all we want to do is grow up.
    We want time to fly, years to pass, until we get to that magical age where everything comes together and life just makes sense.
    I turned 31 last weekend.
    And life still does not make any sense.

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  • Ahh, Mother’s Day. That special day reserved for the ladies who wipe noses and raise future leaders.  Who sacrifice time and energy to create an atmosphere conducive to mothering and loving little ones. Most women are adorned with flowers, sweets, lovely cards or brunch on a patio overlooking the tranquil waves of the lake.
    I got a goat.

  •  JACKSBORO—The Campbell County High School Theatre Arts Spring Semester classes present their final play production of the year: Yearbook. 

  • Dear husband,

    Whenever you part ways with the homestead to endure training for any length of time, things tend to take on a different form around here. The grass grows taller, the laundry pile is smaller, and the children are at a level of crazy of which even the best of scientists and parenting experts offer no explanation. So, allow me to grant you a small window into life as we know it in your absence:

  •  JACKSBORO—Campbell County High School presents “Young Frankenstein” — a collaborative effort between the Advanced Vocal Music class of John Edwards and the Advanced Theatre Arts class of Billie Jo Ralston. 

  •  Bless you, allergy sufferers. That sneezing-wheezing-coughing-itching, hard-to-focus-on-anything time of year is back with a vengeance. Symptoms associated with allergies are annoying for most. But for others, allergic reactions may lead to more serious conditions such as asthma and sinus infections. If left untreated, a patient’s quality of life may suffer. An estimated 26 million Americans — roughly 20 percent of the population — are affected by seasonal allergies, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 

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    Meals served daily, $4 per person

     

    Thursday

                                                                 

    9:30 a.m. Line Dance Class