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Today's Sports

  • JAKES Day introduces kids to the...

    Area youngsters flocked to the inaugural JAKES Day hosted last weekend by Billy and Jamie Ball at the family farm just outside of LaFollette.

    Over 350 people attended the event, including 108 children and youths ages 17-and-under.

    “We were shooting for 100 the first year,” said Jamie Ball.

    “We already have people interested in coming next year.”

    JAKES Day is a community outreach program of the National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF). JAKES is an acronym for Juniors Acquiring Knowledge, Ethics and Sportsmanship.

  • Girls AAU team completes...

    The Campbell County Lady Cougars 14-under/9th grade division AAU Basketball Team enjoyed a very successful 20-7 season this year, which included winning five area East Tennessee AAU Tournament championships and finishing as runner-up in two other AAU Tournaments.

    The Lady Cougars AAU organization, which has been based in Jacksboro since 2006 and coached by Randy Brown, has enjoyed an impressive six-year record of 137 victories against only 33 defeats while winning 28 area AAU tournaments and finishing as runner-up in 13 others.

  • Powder Mill Night Tournament...

    Rick and Kathy Childs took 1st place with 10.08 lbs. of bass last week during a Powder Mill Night Tournament on Norris Lake. Runners-up were Brian Miller and John Carroll with 10.04 lbs., while David Hatfield and Robbie Powell placed 3rd with 9.00 lbs. Kathy Childs was big fish winner with a 4.07 lb. bass.

  • Fishing is slow during daylight...

    The following is a weekly summary of the fishing conditions on Norris Lake as reported by creel clerks from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA).

    After being above full pool for much of the spring and early summer months, the lake level is now 1,018.21 feet and falling. Surface temperatures remain in the mid 80s, although 65-degree water can be found 33 feet deep. The water is clear at all locations.

  • Tennessee Wildlife Resources...

     State wildlife commission welcomes new members

    Jim Bledsoe of Jamestown, Harold Cannon of Lenoir City and Trey Teague of Jackson are the three new members of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Commission (TWRC). The new appointees, who received their confirmations to the commission in late spring, attended an orientation session last week at the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) state office.

  • LaFollette girls make first trip...

    The 10- and 11-year-old All-Stars became the first LaFollette team in that age group to qualify for the Tennessee Little League Softball Tournament when they recently traveled to Jonesborough for state play.

    Jason Rutherford, who coached most of the girls on the LaFollette Skittles team during the regular season, said the trip was an eye-opening experience for his players.

    After playing most of the summer against 9- and 10-year-olds, the LaFollette All-Stars had to move up a division in the tournament because they had a couple of older girls on their team.

  • Campbell County football team...

    Campbell County High School’s football team participated in a four-team passing scrimmage Thursday at Alcoa.

    The Cougars went up against Knoxville West, Jefferson County and seven-time defending state champion Alcoa in 7-on-7 passing situations.

    “We did a lot better,” said Campbell County coach Justin Price.

    “That’s the best we’ve looked all summer, offensively and defensively.

  • Comer wins national title

  • SPORTS NOTES - July 28

    The Tri-City Little League Football program needs players ages 10-12 for its cutter and peewee teams. For more information, call 423-566-1400.

    Former UT basketball player Damon Johnson will be conducting a summer camp at LaFollette Elementary School on Monday evenings from  6 -7:30 p.m. The price of each session is $20.

  • Trapped bear freed by wildlife...

    A black bear that suffered through three weeks of anguish due to having a plastic container stuck over its head is now safe and sound because of the persistence of a well-trained wildlife officer.